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How to Receive NOAA Satellite Images

For more than 50 years the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s weather satellites have been helping monitor the earth’s weather patterns. Now over on YouTube max30max31 (IZ5RZR) has posted a tutorial on how you can receive images from the NOAA weather satellites (NOAA-9, NOAA-15, NOAA-18, NOAA-19) at home using an RTL-SDR. He gives a full walk through of using Orbitron to track the satellites, WXtoImg to decode received images and using SDRSharp to tune your RTL-SDR. He also suggests building and using a QFH Antenna or Turnstile Antenna with your RTL-SDR to receive the satellites.

Here is a list of programs used and homepage links:

If you’re looking for some antenna designs, check out:

Here is an example of and image you could receive:

NOAA 18 at 16 Oct 2011 21:17:42 GMT

 

UPDATE: Jordan Jean-Philippe Blanchard has shared a link on the RTL-SDR Facebook Group to his setup for receiving the weather satellite images using an RTL-SDR, check out his setup & check out what he has received.

hillbillysatellitetracking

Tracking of Low Orbit Satellites with a Dish & RTL-SDR

Travis Goodspeed has shared a project on his blog about his adventure in tracking low orbit satellites using a fairly complex setup. He is using a dish intended for connecting to one of the Inmarsat satellites while at sea on a maritime vessel, a EiBotBoard connected to a BeagleBone for motor control and a RTL-SDR for receiving radio signals from the dish. His goal has been to track the whole sky, including moving targets and it looks like he has been pretty successful.

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At Black Hat DC in 2008, I watched Adam Laurie present a tool for mapping Ku-band satellite downlinks, which he has since rewritten as Satmap. His technique involves using an DVB-S card in a Linux computer as a receiver through a 90cm Ku-band dish with fixed elevation and a DiSEqC motor for azimuth motion. It was among the most inspirational talks I’d ever seen, and I had a blast recreating his setup and scanning the friendly skies. However, such a rig is limited to geostationary satellites in a small region of the sky; I wanted to see the whole sky, especially the moving targets.

In this article, I’ll demonstrate a method for modifying a naval telecommunications dish to track moving targets in the sky, such as those in Low Earth Orbit. My dish happily sits in Tennessee, while I direct it using my laptop or cellphone here in Europe. It can also run unattended, tracking moving targets and looking for downlink channels.” — Travis Goodspeed

 

via RTL-SDR.com

Brazil pirates on SATCOM 255 MHz

Brazil pirates on SATCOM 255 MHzUsing gqrx with my newsky dvb-t dongle (rtlsdr) to listen to the geostationary SATCOM which is frequently utilized by brazil radio pirates. Source

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RTLSDR WFM FM Broadcast With SDRSharp (SDR#)

RTLSDR WFM FM Broadcast With SDRSharp (SDR#)This is a test of the WFM demod with SDR# and the RTLSDR. Yes I know I have a lot of noise, this is due to Corsair power supplies. I would never recommend a Corsair power supply. Source

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SATCOM pirates received via RTLSDR

“Using gqrx with my newsky dvb-t dongle (rtlsdr) to listen to the geostationary SATCOM which is frequently utilized by brazil radio pirates.” – trylleklovn

COSPAS-SARSAT Reception using RTL SDR

“Receiving COSPAS-SARSAT transponder on board of a low earth orbiting satellite on 1544.5 MHz (frequency on the SDR display was not calibrated, please ignore).

Using the famous RTL SDR…”the cheapest SDR in town”” for VHF/UHF/SHF covering 64-1700 (up to 2.1 GHz “out of spec” )….this particular one was a Hama Nano.” — MegaOscarVideos

 

[Wikipedia: COSPAS-SARSAT]

 

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